Uh-Ti-Uh

Witch, 24; fat femme of color queering time and space.

I didn’t realize how unmotivated I am by my coursework until this very moment. I have absolutely refused to complete a 1000 word book review and an annotated bibliography and any of my readings for this week. Not because I can’t do it, but because I just don’t want to. 

This isn’t depression. This isn’t anxiety. It’s just me not giving a fuck about grad school because, obviously, why should I give a fuck about grad school. This place is so alienating and I don’t understand the rules or expectations and it fosters so much self-doubt that I’m mostly debilitated. 

All I’m learning is to not trust my ideas or my stories or my readiness. We are constantly reminded how not-ready we are. 

But I don’t want to believe that. I don’t want to believe that I’m not already a knowledge creator, that I’m not already an articulate and valuable thinker. 

I’m coming to terms with the fact that I am not a good academic. I am okay with this. Because I am a good person and that is enough for me.

And I have to acknowledge that I am here right now. This was my choice. I have to accept that this is where I am and that I need to try. 

Though in a larger cosmic landscape this is just a blip, I still need to try. None of this—the pandering,  the circular logic of seminars, the self-important professors— is as important as we’re making it out to be. It’s just another game. All games end. 

rumorsincolor:

"She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful." (x)

I love this show. Like, just yes

This was such a powerful moment, I got chills.

(Source: chriscolfer, via adorkableblackberry)

Bow Down - The reason I put out Bow Down is because I woke up, I went into the studio, I had a chant in my head. It was aggressive, it was angry. It wasn’t the Beyoncé that wakes up every morning, it was the Beyoncé that was angry, it was the Beyoncé that felt the need to defend herself and I listened to it after I finished and I said..
"this is hot!" imma put it out. I’m not gon’ sell it, imma just put it out. People like it? Great. They don’t, they don’t and I won’t do it everyday because that’s not who I am but I feel strong and anyone that says “oh that is disrespectful” Just imagine the person that hates you. Imagine the person that doesn’t believe in you and look in the mirror and say bow down bitch and I guarantee you’ll feel gangsta.

- Beyoncé

(Source: life-of-beyonce, via beauxbatons)

medievalpoc:

Hiya,
I’ve started a new tumblr to share free/open nonfiction ebooks made available by the publisher.
Lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com
The first few titles include
as well as some titles that deal with 20th history
I’d be grateful if you could let your readers know
Cheers
This is an absolute GEM of a tumblr! Thank you so much for letting me know and sharing these FREE BOOKS with everyone!! I have added links in above.

(via therealpossumpope)

All the roles I’ve ever gotten, they’ve been wonderful, but so many have been down-trotting. [Whoopi Goldberg begins to lowly snicker in agreement because she’s had similar roles]. They’ve been women who are pretty much asexual. They haven’t been realized. They have careers but no names. So all of a sudden I was given the opportunity to play someone sexy, mysterious, someone complicated. It was a chance to use my craft, a chance to transform, a chance to surprise myself and the public. And I took it.

I know so many actors in their careers—in the 70s, 80s—fantastic actresses of color who have never been given the opportunity. I’m just so thankful it came to me at this point in my life. [Rosie Perez chimes in that Viola is intelligent, fierce, and sexy in the show].

Listen, I see myself as those things, but I have very rarely seen people who are a physical manifestation of me on the screen. When I was younger it was people like Cicely Tyson and Diahann Carroll who made me believe that I could do it. Then somewhere along the line they disappeared…

I’m glad that Shonda Rhimes saw me. She SAW me. She took me in when I interviewed with Oprah and I said, ‘No one’s ever going to cast me in a sexy role’ and Shonda looked at that interview and said, ‘Well, why not?’ I’m glad she said, ‘Why not?’ I think that’s what makes her a visionary, that’s why she’s special, that’s what makes her iconic.

[Whoopi Goldberg goes back the part of ‘she saw me’ and uses it as a segue to bring up the NY Times article that called Shonda Rhimes ‘an angry black woman’ and referred to Viola Davis as being ‘less classically beautiful than typical tv stars.’]

Beauty is subjective. I’ve heard that statement my entire life that being a dark skinned, black woman. [Whoopi Goldberg mmm hmms in agreement.] You hear it from the time you come out of the womb. Classically not beautiful is a fancy term of saying ugly, and denouncing you, erasing you. Now it worked when I was younger. It no longer works for me now.

It’s like Ruby Dee said, she wanted that hard to get beauty that comes from within—strength courage, and dignity. So many black women came out after that article and used the hashtag to show their face and step into who they are because they’re treating a culture how to treat them and how to see them.

Really at the end of the day, you define you.

Viola Davis on The View

image

(via thechanelmuse)

This is lovely.

(via queeringfeministreality)

(via dynastylnoire)

muslimrave:

one time a boy tried to pull my hijab off

i punched him in the face

closed fist, short swing, right in the jaw

there is a point where you stop trying to educate people and start making the consequences of their racist bullshit real fuckin clear.

(via doyayoda)

I’m an OBGYN and I practice at a jail, where I take care of incarcerated women.

People often ask me, how did you come to work with incarcerated women? I was in the middle of my first year residency, delivering a baby. Everything was very familiar about the delivery scene; the nervousness, wondering if everything was going to be okay, helping the woman to push. But the one thing that was different is that she was shackled to the bed; she was a prisoner. And that moment troubled me so deeply that I developed an interest in learning more about these women.

Women make up a much smaller proportion of the correctional population than men — about 9% of everyone who is incarcerated. And 62% of [those] women are mothers to children who are less than 18 years old. Because women comprise such a small proportion, their gender-specific needs have been neglected. That’s particularly salient when it comes to their healthcare.

In theory, women do have the choice to have an abortion if they learn they are pregnant when they are in prison. There are constitutional guarantees — the 8th and the 14th amendments — and a number of judicial precedents, so it’s very clear that incarcerated women should have access to abortion. However, in practice, the people who are making the decisions have incredible discretion and many women lack access to abortion if they choose it.

About 1400-2000 births occur every year to women who are behind bars, and what they get for prenatal care is highly variable. There are standards that require prisons to have prenatal care onsite, but on the ground, some women have to be transported offsite and some women don’t even get prenatal care.

In labor, they usually get transported to an outside hospital. They can’t have any family support members in the room, and only 15 states have laws restricting the shackling of women in labor and delivery. A woman in labor, shackled, is what inspired me to work with this population. It’s inhumane and unnecessary, and it poses a lot of medical risks to the mother and the fetus. It also interferes with our ability to do emergent interventions if necessary.

People think prisons and jails are far away and we forget about the people who get locked up inside; we think they have nothing to do with us. So I hope I’ve given you some things to consider about what it’s like to be a woman when you’re in the grip of the prison or jail system.

From Dr. Carolyn Sufrin’s talk on incarcerated women and reproductive healthcare. Filmed at TEDxInnerSunset. 

Watch the full talk here »

(via tedx)

(via misandry-mermaid)

ladybrun:

Hey remember all those Pakistani children saying they were afraid to go to school because they feared being attacked by US drone strikes? no? you only know about Malala Yousafzai? because she was attacked by the Taliban instead of your taxes? oh, okay. 

(via bipolarbubbeleh)